Tubeworm

Test of time

Dense accumulations of tubeworms are common in Upper Greensand pebbles washed onto the beaches around Lyme Regis. Tubeworms secreted a hard, protective shell and then used tentacles to extend out and filter sea water for food. They fed on plankton and any other small items that were washing around. Almost identical tubeworms can be found on the beach today. So, like the much more famous and showy nautilus or the spectacular shark, the humble tubeworm is one of nature’s great survivors, having a lifestyle that has stood the test of time.

Find out more on the trace fossils pages.

Common name

Tubeworm

Scientific name

Rotularia concave

Type

Other


Strata

Upper Greensand

Time period

Lower Cretaceous

Age

110 million years

Where found

Pinhay Bay

Found by

Richard Edmonds

Museum

Allhallows Museum, Honiton

Accession number

HONAM.2013.32.05A