Bivalve shell

This is a rare bivalve fossil from the Dorset and East Devon coast because the rock it came from, the Gault strata, is rarely exposed. As the name suggests, bivalves consist of two shells. ‘Bi’ means two and ‘valve’ means shell. The shells are held together by a strong muscle, and hinged at the pointed end. If you’ve eaten scallops, you’ll know how strong the muscles are!

Find out more about bivalves on the molluscs pages.

Common name

Bivalve shell

Scientific name

Inoceramus sulcatus

Type

Molluscs > Bivalves


Strata

Gault

Time period

Lower Cretaceous

Age

105 million years

Where found

Unknown

Found by

Unknown

Museum

Dorset County Museum, Dorchester

Accession number

DCM.G.07184