Bivalve shell

Additional images

Good eating?

This bivalve, Modiolus, is very similar to the modern-day mussel. Like today’s mussels, they probably formed colonies, often partly burying themselves in mud, and filtering the water for food. They in turn would have been food for crabs and starfish.

As the name suggests, bivalves consist of two shells. ‘Bi’ means two and ‘valve’ means shell. The shells are held together by a strong muscle, and hinged at the pointed end. If you’ve eaten scallops, you’ll know how strong the muscles are! 

Find out more about bivalves on the molluscs pages.

Common name

Bivalve shell

Scientific name

Modiolus (Modiolus) bipartitus

Type

Molluscs > Bivalves


Strata

Oxford Clay, Red Nodule Beds

Time period

Upper Jurassic

Age

160 million years

Where found

Weymouth

Found by

Unknown

Museum

Dorset County Museum, Dorchester

Accession number

DCM.G.02879