Exmouth is the western gateway to the Jurassic Coast. It lies on the east bank of the mouth of the River Exe, about 12 miles south east of Exeter. The town has been a popular seaside resort since the 18th century and is thought to be the oldest holiday resort in Devon.

The beach has two miles of golden sand and a wealth of rock pools to explore, making it a paradise for children and families. It is also a popular destination for a variety of watersports including kite surfing, kayaking and windsurfing.

The nearby Exe Estuary is one of the most beautiful in Britain, and is a haven for birdlife. A large part of the estuary lies within a nature reserve and is noted in particular for migrating and wading birds including sandpipers and the rare avocet.

How to Get There

There are regular bus services to Exmouth from Exeter, Sidmouth and Budleigh Salterton. Exmouth railway station is a 25 minute journey from Exeter, which provides connections to London and the rest of the UK.

By road, Exmouth is reached via the A376 which runs south from Exeter and the M5.

For further information, visit our Travel page.

Exmouth seafront
Exmouth seafront and lifeboat station. © Steve Belasco - jurassicphotographic.com

Where to Stay

Visit our Accommodation page for options close to Exmouth.

Sandstone stacks at Ladram Bay, near Exmouth. © Steve Belasco - jurassicphotographic.com

Things to Do

On the way to Budleigh from Exmouth. © James Martin - via Flickr.com

Orcombe Point

Orcombe Point, just to the east of Exmouth, marks the official start of the World Heritage Site. A ‘geoneedle’ on the hilltop was unveiled by HRH The Prince of Wales in 2002 to inaugurate the World Heritage Site. The geoneedle is constructed from stone representing both the major building stones of the Jurassic Coast and the sequence of rocks deposited along its 95 miles.

Orcombe Point and the Geoneedle. © Steve Belasco - jurassicphotographic.com

Stuart Line Cruises

Stuart Lines Cruises are based in Exmouth. Their Jurassic Coast Cruise offers stunning views of the area’s deep red Triassic rocks accompanied by live commentary from their skipper. Tide-permitting, the vessel will sail in close to the cliffs and sea stacks, and then sail further out for a panoramic view. Their vessel is suitable for manual wheelchair users and those with reduced mobility.

Stuart Line Cruises have also teamed with the Jurassic Coast Trust to run an annual evening cruise in late Summer from Exmouth to Sidmouth, with expert commentary from local Jurassic Coast Ambassadors. Have a look at our online shop for upcoming dates.

Sightseeing. © Stuart Line Cruises

RED Rock Leisure

Based just outside Exmouth, RED Rock Leisure can help you explore the western end of the Jurassic Coast through Paddleboarding, Kayaking, Windsurfing and Kitesurfing.

Paddleboarders. © Red Rock Leisure

Budleigh Salterton

Budleigh Salterton is a tranquil and historic seaside town lying about 5 miles east of Exmouth. Situated within the East Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, it nestles on the edge of a pebble beach beneath some of the Jurassic Coast’s most spectacular Triassic red sandstone cliffs.

Budleigh Salterton is also home to the fascinating Fairlynch Museum.

Budleigh Salterton Esplanade. © Shirokazan - via Flickr.com

Otterton Mill

The beautiful and historic Otterton Mill is just a short drive from Exmouth and is well worth a visit. Featuring award-winning food accompanied by gorgeous views of the River Otter, the Mill has been in continuous use for over 1,000 years, making it one of the world’s oldest businesses. It’s also a brilliant base for walks in the Otter Valley and to the nearby coast at Budleigh Salterton.

Otterton Mill Courtyard
Courtyard. @ Otterton Mill

Car Parking & Facilities

East Devon District Council’s website has comprehensive parking information for Exmouth. Accessible parking is available near the Orcombe Point Geoneedle.

Boats moored at Exmouth
Boats moored at Exmouth. © Visit Devon